Honouring learning as a continuous process rather than a series of separate events, teachers design opportunities for students to develop an understanding of learning processes and to reflect on their learning journeys. The mindset shift to communicating student learning creates the conditions for personalized portfolios of learning that activate student voice, inform teacher practice, and engage parents in their child’s learning. Ultimately, transforming reporting to communicating student learning shifts the ownership from teachers to a shared ownership among students, parents and teachers. The Four Elements of Learning Documentation aim to provide parents a “window” into student learning through:

 

  • Authentic Evidence – Showing growth over time in what the learner KNOWS, can DO, and what they understand;
  • Quality Assessment – Information that informs both learning and teaching, shifting ownership to SHARED OWNERSHIP between learner, teacher, and parent;
  • Learning Standards – Evidence demonstrates growth in relation to the Learning Standards of B.C.’s Curriculum; and
  • Voice – Learning is deepened with the presence of STUDENT, TEACHER, and PARENT voice.

As you navigate through the resource, please note the PURPLE LIGHTBULB ICON that when clicked, connects you to “Behind the Scenes Thinking” – interviews of teachers sharing their thoughts, challenges, and insights related to the documentation.


Primary Student

Grade
K-3
Teacher
Surrey Educators

Portfolio

May 30, 2017
23 Views

Science, Visual Arts, and Core Competencies: Changes over time - The Story of Trees


Activity Details

After spending time with the provocation:  “How do you show respect and responsibility for the natural world?” we read The Tree by Dana Lyons.  We learned that the story is actually a song that the author believes was gifted to him by a tree.  We were inspired to use our senses to listen to our own tree on our school grounds.  We looked, listened, and touched a tree of choice in order to think carefully about what it might be saying to us, and captured our thinking in pictures and words.  After sharing our documentation with each other, we began to wonder where our trees had come from.  A sense of care and concern for our trees’ future also began to emerge.  These careful observations and wonders began to come together as a timeline and we decided to share the journey of our trees.  We considered:  “What is the story of my tree?” as we thought about this important aspect of our local environment over time.

Learning Standards:

  • I can use my senses to experience and interpret my local environment.
  • I can consider some environmental consequences of my actions.

Core Competencies:

  • I can show respect and responsibility for the natural world.
  • I can share my ideas about a topic that is important to me.

Documents

ASSESSMENT: PROFICIENT

Artifact Source: Sarah Schnare, Surrey Schools

May 30, 2017
Surrey Educators
Blake, you have made some careful observations and noticed important things about your tree as it is today. You considered possibilities for how you tree came to be and you've even imagined a time before our school grounds were here! You remembered that our school was build on our old grass field and you added your own ideas. When we do this as learners, we call this creative thinking! I can sure hear your voice in your work when you picture your tree in the future and how healthy it will be. This shows your positive outlook and your confidence in communicating your thinking! Thank you for sharing the story of your tree over time.
April 21, 2017
26 Views

Investigating Addition Strategies - "Showing the Knowing"


Activity Details

An important part of Math is showing and sharing the strategies you use to solve a problem. To do this, the class first explored a number of strategies together such as doubles, near doubles and ten friends. Students then chose a math problem and explained how they were able to solve it. Some used the strategies we explored together and some went on to create their own.

Learning Standards:

  • Develop and use multiple addition strategies to 100
  • Communicate mathematical thinking in many ways
  • Explain and justify mathematical ideas and decisions

Documents

ASSESSMENT: EXTENDING

Artifact Source: Stacey Lamirand, Surrey Schools

April 21, 2017
Surrey Educators
Samuel, you are developing some very sophisticated strategies for solving addition problems. Rearranging numbers to make more familiar combinations is a very efficient way to work with numbers. Thank you for sharing your thinking!
February 24, 2017
26 Views

Developing Scientists - Living and Non-living Things


Activity Details

When we went into the forest on February 16, our goal was to answer the following big question: “What makes something living?” We took pictures or things that we thought were living and non-living. We then used the app Book Creator to organize and label our pictures into living and non-living. We then challenged ourselves to look at our pictures of living things and determine the characteristics that make something living. As a class we came up with ideas which are posted below. We then recorded out thinking about why something was living or non-living using the criteria we created as a class. This was just our first experience with this, and we will keep developing our understanding of living and non-living. If you notice your child has mis-labelled something, talk to them about it as this helps develop their understanding.  

Learning Standards:

  • I can tell the difference between living and non-living things
  • I can observe and record what I see

Core Competencies:

  • I can work with others to achieve a common goal; I do my share.
  • I can summarize key ideas
  • I can understand and share information about a topic that is important to me.

Documents

ASSESSMENT: PROFICIENT

Artifact Source: Shannon Howlett, Surrey Schools

February 24, 2017
Surrey Educators
Gabriel demonstrates a good understanding of why some things are living and non-living. He is able to theorize and articulate his ideas clearly. For example, he talked about how the roots bring food and water to the tree. You can support him to challenge himself by encouraging him to describe how the food and water help the tree grow which is why it is living.
February 27, 2017
Parent
Gabriel is very curious on how they were made. As he really likes science, he was very proud to show this video to his brother and explained what living and non-living is, just like how the 'pumpkin cycle grow'. He then remembered a book we read about the life cycle of a butterfly and frog.
February 27, 2017
Primary Student
I think that the tree is living because the roots are still in the ground and the roots are getting more food for the tree.
December 17, 2016
2 Views

Celebrations of Learning


Activity Details

Learning is a social process and takes place in all that students do. Students participate in a variety of group processes to not only learn about new things, but they activate and develop important “CORE COMPETENCIES”  such as communication, creative and critical thinking, and personal and social responsibility, which are sets of skills and abilities all students need in order to engage in deep learning and life-long learning.

Find out more about the CORE COMPETENCIES.


Documents

NOTE: We know that through a variety of activities provided at school, students are constantly learning new things. When artifacts are loaded into portfolios without adequate documentation, we make the assumption that parents will understand the learning embedded in the activity. Without context, this can be challenging. This artifact demonstrates the concept of grouping this type of documentation, "Celebrations of Learning" into a single "bucket" or activity so as to both simplify the portfolio and provide parents the necessary information to understand not only what is being shared, but why. By clicking on an artifact above, notice the attached documentation that allows parents to make sense of what has been posted.

June 30, 2017
16 Views

Final Report on Student Learning


Activity Details

This year evidence of your child’s learning has been captured and shared with you through digital portfolios. This document is a summary of your child’s progress this year in relation to the learning standards of the B.C. Curriculum (what your child knows, can do, and understands) and identifies goals in preparation for Grade 4.

While viewing your child’s complete portfolio, please use this summary, as well as the parent prompts below,  for a comprehensive understanding of your child’s learning. Parents and students maintain ongoing access to the portfolio from grade to grade. You are encouraged to login in at www.freshgrade.com and continue to reflect on and celebrate the learning of the past year over the summer months.

Congratulations … you are assigned to Grade 4 in September, 2017.

Have a safe and wonderful summer!


Documents
May 28, 2017
5 Views

Performance Scale Descriptions for Parents


Activity Details

Dear Parents,

This year, we will be using new performance scale language to assess student learning. We know sometimes the language we use in education is difficult to understand, so it is our hope that this brief description will help. These are a few simple phrases a student may use at each level. Detailed descriptions can be found in the graphic below.

  • Emerging – “I’m just getting started.” “I learn best with help.”
  • Developing – “I’m getting there” “I am beginning to do more and more on my own.”
  • Proficient – “I get it.” “I can do it on my own.”
  • Extending – “I get it and go beyond what is expected of me.” “I can teach it to a friend.”

As always, if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to let me know.

And if you want to see this language translated…

ترجمه 已翻译 Traduire अनुवाद 번역됨 Anuvwd Traducir Sinalin sa wikang  go to:  bit.ly/sd36talk


Documents
April 11, 2017
14 Views

Social Responsibility Self-Assessment


Activity Details

An important part of social responsibility is solving problems in peaceful ways.  To do this, students are supported in developing an understanding that sometimes people have difference views and opinions, and are encouraged to think of, use, and decide the effectiveness of problem-solving strategies.  

In our class, reading a powerful picture book, “What do you do with a problem” led to great discussions about the problems we sometimes face and how we solve them.

Students then shared personal examples of problems they have experiences and their attempts to resolve them.


Documents

Artifact Source: Kerri Hutchinson, Surrey Schools

April 11, 2017
Surrey Educators
This is a wonderful example of how you demonstrate your social responsibility. You shared how you peacefully solved the problem you had!
November 24, 2016
28 Views

Student Self-Assessment of Core Competencies


Activity Details

We practiced reflecting on our development in the Personal and Social Core Competency. We are learning about what it means to be socially responsible. We reflected on the “I can” statements below and chose one that we feel we are strongest in. We drew a picture of a time we demonstrated this competency and reflected on how it made us feel.

  • I am kind to others and can work or play cooperatively
  • I can participate in classroom and group activities
  • I am aware of how other may feel and try to include them
  • I can help others
  • I can persevere when something is hard

Documents

Artifact Source: Shannon Howlett, Surrey Schools

November 28, 2016
Primary Student
The time that we were making our mural and then I was making a rain cloud. I was working cooperatively with Reuben to use pastels to make a rain cloud. I let Reuben share his ideas and I listened to his ideas. Reuben listened to my ideas. I felt calm when I was cooperating with Reuben because we didn't get any problems.
November 28, 2016
Parent
I love the mural that all your class made - it's awesome. I can see the cloud was made with lots of effort. I like to hear that you can can work with other class mates and create something so beautiful.
November 16, 2016
13 Views

Reading Fluency - "Two of the same"


Activity Details

Throughout the year children read a new book to the classroom teacher. The book is chosen based on the student’s reading level. We call this a  ‘good fit’ book. When children begin to read, there are a number of reading strategies we want them to develop and use, including:

  • Looking at the picture for clues
  • Pointing to the words as they read
  • Sounding out the words they do not know
  • Re-read the sentence if it doesn’t make sense
  • Using common sight words

How many of these strategies do you notice?

Learning standards:

  • I can read “good fit” books fluently
  • I can use reading strategies to help me understand: using pictures, rereading, self-correcting, identifying familiar and “sight” words, monitoring (asking: Does it look right? Sound right? Make sense?)

Documents

ASSESSMENT: DEVELOPING

Artifact Source: Kim Bomford, Surrey Schools

November 25, 2016
Surrey Educators
At the beginning of Grade One Tristan relied on the pictures and repeating pattern of the book to help him read. This was great to see him use these strategies. He needed reminders to point to the words or he missed them. At the end of November Tristan was pointing to each word, he was re-reading a sentence if it didn't make sense and he was making meaningful substitutions (he said 'find' instead of 'see'). Tristan's next steps are to practice his sight words and to continue to read aloud each day to improve his reading fluency (ability to read text accurately, quickly and with expression).
November 17, 2016
Primary Student
"I am getting better at reading by learning how to sound out words. I know more words because I practice my reading at home. I read the same book so I can get better at it. It makes me happy because I am learning to read better."